Indiana Parenting Time Guidelines

Custody disputes aren’t just difficult on the parents, they also have a considerable impact on the children involved. For this reason, it’s important that you attempt to resolve your custody disagreements with your child’s other parent as soon as you can so that their lives aren’t further upended.

There are many different ways you can formulate your parenting plan, but the most common agreement  is one parent retaining physical custody while the other becomes the non-custodial parent, thus entering into a joint legal custody arrangement.

In short, your children will primarily reside with one parent but have a set visitation schedule with the non-custodial parent. Both parents will be responsible for making important decisions regarding their child’s upbringing, such as what religion they are raised in, what schools they attend, and the like.

It’s critical that you always act in your child’s best interest, no matter which parenting plan agreement you come to. With this in mind, we describe what it takes to meet your child’s basic needs and what parenting time looks like for the non-custodial parent in Indiana.

Meeting Your Child’s Basic Needs

The state recognizes certain needs of children that must be met in order to promote a healthy lifestyle. Some of these criteria include the following:

  • Making sure your children know that your separation from their other parent isn’t their fault
  • Spending regular quality time with both parents
  • Being financially supported by both parents
  • Not alienating your children against their other parent
  • Being safe and secure when in their parents’ care

If you have further questions about steps you can take to become a better parent and ensure that each of your child’s basic needs are met, please reach out to a compassionate family law attorney today.

Guidelines for the Non-Custodial Parent

Generally speaking, the non-custodial parent will have a set visitation schedule that includes overnights, school, summer vacation time, and holidays. The schedule you agree to will largely depend on the child’s age and what works best for your family.

For example, the state recognizes that infants under the age of eighteen months need to spend as much time with their primary caregiver as possible. For non-custodial parents who have regularly been a part of their child’s life, it will be in the best interests of the child to spend just one overnight per week at the non-custodial parents home until they reach the age of three, at which point a new overnight schedule can be implemented.

Keep in mind that your parenting plan will be unique to your specific situation, which is why it would be well-advised to work with an attorney to ensure that your parenting plan meets the basic needs of your children.

Work with an Indiana Family Law Attorney

If you are interested in learning more about the state’s parenting time guidelines, or if you are in the middle of a child custody dispute and need legal representation, contact a regarded Indiana family law attorney at Rowdy G. Williams Law Firm today.

You can take advantage of our free consultations by giving our office a call at 1-812-232-7400 or by filling out the brief contact form we have included below.